Deciphering Secrets / Parchment Project

I’m taking an online class about Medieval manuscripts and the first project is to create a simulated “parchment” after examining online samples.

Of course, I have actual samples of parchment in my art supplies, but in interests of participating with the rest of the class that is doing the project according to the rubric, here goes.

Referenced manuscripts:

1)  I have in mind to do a few pages from a bestiary as the final project, so my first stop is to look at several pages from the Aberdeen Bestiary housed at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. Looking at several of the pages, there does not seem to be a dramatic difference in color from the hair side to the flesh side, though the flesh side does have many obvious vein lines.  The pages also show discoloration in the lower left and right hand corners, but I think that can be ascribed to turning the pages.

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/bestiary/ms24/f17v

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/bestiary/ms24/f17v

The University of Abeerdeen claims copyright but allows for personal use and research purposes.

2)  I’ve also looked at the Bedford Hours housed at the British Library, London, UK. The Bedford Hours do not show a lot of differentiation in color between the pages, nor a lot of obvious follicles or vein lines but a few.  There is discoloration on the edges, but again that might be from handling over the years.

http://www.bl.uk/turning-the-pages/?id=d06e9f02-074d-46f7-a46c-090548b402d5&type=book

Appears to be in the public domain due to the age of the work.  (The British Library states a copyright term of 70 years after the death of the author/creator.)

3)  Next I looked at the “Golf Book”, an amazing work by the Flemish Master Simon Bening.  However the book is so lavishly decorated it’s hard to see the underlying parchment.  There are a few discolorations in less decorated sections.  Also housed in the British Library.

http://www.bl.uk/turning-the-pages/?id=6a8fcef9-4373-46f4-8de9-7b6603024f43&type=book

Copyright as above.

4)  Last I went to look at the famous Book of Kells housed at Trinity University, Dublin, Ireland. The Book of Kells is the oldest of the manuscripts I’ve viewed and has the most dramatic color differences from flesh side to hair side with more visible follicles showing and some veining.  It is discolored due to its age and has several visible repairs.

http://digitalcollections.tcd.ie/home/index.php?DRIS_ID=MS58_003v

Copyright 2012 The Board of Trinity College Dublin. Images are available for single-use academic application only. Publication, transmission or display is prohibited without formal written approval of Trinity College Library, Dublin.
5)  Last I looked at some parchment that I have in hand.  One shows a pretty dramatic change in color from the flesh side to the hair side, the hair side being more yellow. The other is less dramatic, but the hair side is more yellow than the hair side.

The piece I would use for the actual project is cut from a half hide and is slightly more yellow on the hair side.  Both sides have a blemish where the parchment looks a little thin but I’m excited to put this piece to use.

For the simulated “parchment” project I am using 100 lb vellum surface Bristol Board.  To begin the transformation, I am using tea to color the “hair” side.  My first thought was to use a brush, but because I don’t want the paper to get too wet I used a sponge instead.

There doesn’t seem to be a big difference in the before and after, but I will let it dry overnight and look at it in the morning. The paper is curling on the edges.

I decided that I really didn’t like the tea dye, so I started over with a new piece of Bristol board using dilute walnut ink instead.

parchment-3

Then after taping the paper to my work surface, due to curling, I used dilute iron gall ink and a small stenciling brush, to add “hair follicles”.

parchment-hair-side

For the flesh side, using a small brush, size 3/0 and dilute walnut ink, I added capillary/vein lines.

parchment-flesh-side

I hope the photos are sufficient to convey what I was doing.  The light isn’t very good in that part of my residence.

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